SET Builds First Samsung Smart School Within A Hospital

Last year, Samsung Electronics Taiwan (SET) received an invitation from the Make-A-Wish Foundation International to donate a Samsung Galaxy S7 to make a child’s wish come true.

The child in particular was A-Fu, a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with leukaemia. A-Fu has a passion for photography, and wanted to carry on with his hobby as much as he was able while in hospital, but needed a smartphone in order to do so.

SET heard of A-Fu’s wish through its partnership with Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, and gifted him with a Samsung Galaxy S7 to help him capture the beauty he sees in everyday life.

After fulfilling A-Fu’s wish, SET discovered that an average of 500 children are diagnosed with cancer in Taiwan every year. Like A-Fu, they’re in hospitals undergoing challenging treatment, which sees many children hospitalised for an average of three months. Unfortunately, such medical difficulties make the concept of going to school impossible.

With these children’s educational needs in mind, and in an effort to introduce more fun to help alleviate their pain, SET proposed to build a Samsung Smart School within a hospital, and invited Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital to partner in the effort.

“Samsung Electronics Taiwan has contributed 15 Smart Schools in 15 elementary schools in the past three years,” SET told CIE. “The main purpose of this project is to digitalise healthcare information and education and reduce the anxiety of children undergoing challenging treatments.”

This led to SET building the first hospital-based Samsung Smart School at Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital. Featuring two spacious classrooms equipped with tablets and TVs, the facility’s design reflects those of other Smart Schools established in Taiwan.

“According to the Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, the hospital often needs to take away things like books and toys, or close public area such as paediatric playrooms and activity rooms to prevent nosocomial infections,” says SET.

“This has made life in hospital more difficult for hospitalised children. However, the first hospital-based Samsung Smart School features two classrooms equipped with tablets and TVs, of which the material can all sustain frequent sterilisation and sanitisation.

Having successfully implemented the first-of-its-kind Smart School, SET is now inviting more hospitals, social workers, volunteers, art therapists and other relevant parties to partner in efforts that will provide more children access to diverse and enriching educational resources.

Hospitals can also utilise tablets as a new means to carry out routine health education initiatives with parents and children, while hospital volunteers may also adopt digital content as an innovative way to promote learning.

“We are honoured to partner with Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital to implement the first Smart School in Hospital, and will continuously collaborate with more hospitals, especially those specialising in health care of children,” says SET.